Walking meditation techniques from the Teachers for your Tool Box

monk walking, Walking meditation techniques

Walking meditation techniques from the Teachers for your Tool Box

Walking is a great way to keep your body and mind at peace. Unfortunately, we all walk in a rush, with a purpose. Not toward finding beauty and peace, but with a goal in sight. Mindful walking does not have an end in sight, it is the end. The walking meditation techniques Thich Nhat Hanh practices have always been my favorite.

Walking has many health benefits. Mindful walking takes us to a different level and allows us to develop and grow. Every step is enjoyable. Every step helps you touch the wonders of life. Every step is joy. That is possible. So, let’s go for a mindful walk with some of the Teachers:

  • Ven Thich Nhat Hanh
  • Ven Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
  • Ven Ajahn Nyanadhammo
  • Ven Luang Por Liem Thitadhammo

Ven Thich Nhat Hanh

Thich Nhat Hanh, Walking meditation techniques

Birth name Nguyễn Xuân Bảo and was born in Huế, Central Vietnam on October 11, 1926. He is a Vietnamese Buddhist monk. At the age of 16 he entered the monastery at Từ Hiếu Temple near Huế, Vietnam, where his primary teacher was Zen Master Thanh Quý Chân Thật.

Thích Nhất Hạnh and the Order of Interbeing have established monasteries and Dharma centers in the United States at Deer Park Monastery in Escondido, California, Maple Forest Monastery and Green Mountain Dharma Center in Vermont along with Magnolia Village Practice Center in Mississippi, These monasteries are open to the public during much of the year and provide ongoing retreats for laypersons.

Thích Nhất Hạnh lives in the Plum Village meditation center in southwest France, travelling internationally to give retreats and talks. He coined the term “Engaged Buddhism” in his book Vietnam: Lotus in a Sea of Fire. Nhất Hạnh has published more than 100 books, including more than 40 in English.

You can read more on his walking meditation here.

 

Ven Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

He was
born Nguam Phanit in 1906 in Ban Phumriang, Chaiya District, southern Thailand. He became a monk in 1926.Buddhadasa Bhikkhu, Walking meditation techniques

Typical of young monks during the time, he traveled to the capital, Bangkok, for doctrinal training but found the it to be dirty, crowded, and, most troubling to him, the sangha  (Buddist community) corrupt, “preoccupied with prestige, position, and comfort with little interest in the highest ideals of Buddhism.” As a result, he returned to his native rural district and occupied a forest tract near to his village. He named it Suan Mokkh from Thai “garden” and Pali moksha “release, liberation”. He strove for a simple, pristine practice in attempt to emulate Gautama Buddha’s core teaching, “Do good, avoid bad, and purify the mind.” He avoided the customary ritualism and internal politics that dominated Siamese clerical life. His ability to explain complex philosophical and religious ideas in his native Southern Thai attracted many people to his wooded retreat.

However, Buddhadasa was skeptical of his fame; when reflecting on the busloads of visitors to Suan Mokkh he would say, “sometimes I think many of these people just stop here because they have to visit the bathroom.”

You can read more on his walking meditation here.

 

Ven Ajahn Nyanadhammo

Ajahn Nyanadhammo, Walking meditation techniques

Ajahn Nyanadhammo
was born in Adelaide, Australia in 1955. In 1978, he traveled to Thailand for ordination from Somdet Phra Nyanasamvara. He received full ordination with Ajahn Chah and then spent many years in the jungle practicing meditation and learning Dhamma from great teachers living in secluded monasteries. From 1994 to 2002, he
stayed at Bodhinyana Monastery as deputy to Ajahn Brahm. Since 2002, he has been the Abbot of Wat Pa Nanachat and has since established another monastery two hour drive from Bangkok: Wat Ratanawon (Forest Jewel).

You can read more on his walking meditation here.

Ven Luang Por Liem Thitadhammo

Luang Por Liem Ṭhitadhammo is a Buddhist monk in the Thai Forest Tradition. He was born in Sri Saket Province in theLuang Por Liem Thitadhammo, Walking meditation techniques

Northeast of Thailand on the 5th of November 1941. After ordination at twenty years old, Luang Por practised in several village monasteries until he joined the Forest Tradition in 1969. He took training under Luang Pu Chah, who later became one of the most famous monks in the country, and whose reputation and influence has continued to spread throughout the world. After Luang Pu Chah became severely ill in 1982, he entrusted Luang Por Liem to lead the monastery.

Shortly thereafter, the Sangha of Wat Nong Pah Pong appointed Luang Por Liem to take over the abbotship. He continues this duty  keeping the heritage of Luang Pu Chah’s Dhamma and characteristic ways of monastic training available for monks, nuns and lay disciples.

You can read more on his walking meditation here.

CONCLUSION

Walking meditation. I have been practicing this for years, after a fashion. Not knowing exactly all the key elements, not putting the proper preperation or thought into what I was doing, not even aware  I was engaged in meditation. I walked because I needed the exercise, I needed to just get away. Walking always served a purpose; to burn away excess energy, to calm down, even to plan the next action.

Use the first four tools to prepare for walking meditation and then walk. No need for any hurry, no need for a particular posture or stepping in a special way. Walk naturally and just be. Experience. You may wish to allow thoughts to just pass thru and not linger, or you may concentrate on something you wish to improve within yourself.

I like to use music when I meditate, especially when walking. Mother Earth can and does provide a rich soundtrack that cannot be taken for granted. Always changing and always interesting. Man-made music can be taylored for mindful walking meditation. Set up a playlist of your choice, one complied of music geared toward what you wish to concentrate on and experience a mindful walk.

Have you practiced mindful walking? I would like to hear your eperiences. If you haven’t, why not try it now?

 

Questions, comments are always welcome!

Walking the Path of Peace,

Sanders

relaxationandmeditationmusic.com

 

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One thought on “Walking meditation techniques from the Teachers for your Tool Box

  1. vivek

    May 16, 2018 at 3:56am

    This post is a nice follow up to your previous one on walking meditation. I have read Thich Nhat Nanh’s books previously but I’ll check out the other ones you’ve mentioned as well.
    I’m curious, what sort of meditation music do you use when walking?

    Permalink  ⋅ Reply
    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      May 16, 2018 at 5:37am

      Hi Vivik,
      Thank you. Glad I got the chance to add some more information for you on walking meditation. Nice of you to ask about my walking meditation music. My answer may be a little confusing… For Mindful Walking, I prefer the natural sounds around me. If needed, I use a playlist of Nature sounds. If walking to meditate on a problem or something I want to improve about myself, flute music or ambient with alpha waves binaural beats. If just walking for the sake of walking, good old rock and roll.
      Rock on!
      Sanders

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  2. Dianna Donohue

    May 18, 2018 at 12:51am

    I really like the thought of walking and meditating at the same time. I guess this is what I do when I walk along the beach listening to the waves crashing and the sound of birds and my dogs barking.

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    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      May 18, 2018 at 1:50am

      Dianna,
      You naturally meditate. So glad that you have the ocean to walk along. It is some of the best natural music there is! Enjoy and pet the dogs fro me.
      Walk in the Path of Peace,
      Sanders

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  3. Larmu189

    May 18, 2018 at 12:55am

    You have great post..Love it natural sounds and great music..

    Permalink  ⋅ Reply
    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      May 18, 2018 at 1:47am

      Hi Larmu,
      Glad you like the post. I really like the natural sounds too. Some of my favorites are the ocean surf and thunderstorms.
      Walk in the Path of Peace,
      Sanders

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  4. Kevin McNamara

    May 18, 2018 at 1:32am

    Hi Sanders,

    Great post. I teach meditation here in Australia and you have spoken about some great teachers here. Meditation is such a great thing to do in our lives. So much worry and tension dissipates when we meditate and let our thoughts dissolve.

    We live near the beach and I find nothing better than walking along the sand in the early morning and taking it all in, being present and just letting life be.

    Thanks for a great post 🙂

    Kev

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    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      May 18, 2018 at 2:08am

      Kev,
      Thank you. I am a catch as catch can student, I mean that I take a little from hrer and there and try to find what works for me. The Teachers I mentioned have all given me some of what I do, but countless others also shared. I use meditation to resolve and to use stress.
      I think the beach is a great place to walk and to just be. Now, I live in Iowa, a long way from the beach. But I do have a small stream not far from my house that I can’t walk by but do stand and sometimes sit by, just for the sound of water. Great expression– Letting Life Be.
      Walk in the Path of Peace,
      Sanders

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  5. Angie

    May 18, 2018 at 2:58am

    I really need to do this. I’m rushing everywhere all of the time with study and a 2 year old, plus I have aggressive neighbours that can really stress me out. I have read a bit of Thich Nhat Hanh, but hadn’t heard of the other Teachers. I do try to at least take some time to breath, and also orient myself in my body and surroundings, I think that’s somatic healing, but similar to mindfulness I think. Thank-you for reminding me of the simple bliss of getting back in my body and taking notice of where I am. Your page has a really good energy. Cheers, Angie

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    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      May 18, 2018 at 3:27am

      Angie,
      Thank you! A two year old can be enough stress for a lot of reasons. But they can be a blessing in disguise. Did you know a child can teach? When the little one is playing or sleeping, just watch and let your mind relax. Just be in the moment… The neighbors, good luck with them. Just remember they too shall pass. No need to allow them to intrude into your thoughts.
      Sometimes, we just need to take a bit of time for ourselves and let the world rush on by. Try to set aside 10 minutes of study time in the morning and in the afternoon; just to breath, to let your mind travel where it will. Without “me” time, there is no chance to recharge and to live a full life.
      Walk in the Path of Peace,
      Sanders

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  6. thomas g

    May 18, 2018 at 5:16am

    I have walked in meditation here and there on my own but had no idea of this “way”. This has spurred me to walk with more consistent mindfullness. Walking and clearing the mind of active thoughts is an incredible way to leave room for entering intuition. i am glad to know that I was/am actually doing someting that has a real purpose. Thanks for the article!

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    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      May 18, 2018 at 5:51am

      Hi Thomas,
      You just described what I felt when I first heard of Mindful Walking. It always amazes me how good it feels to have something click. Glad you enjoyed the article, remember the purpose is not to take a journey but to be in the journey.
      Walk the Path of Peace,
      Sanders

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  7. Adam

    June 12, 2018 at 5:42am

    This is a great article. I am an avid sitting meditator but have not yet tapped into the full power of walking meditation. I find it to be a bit more challenging than sitting meditation. This is because when sitting, I only need to focus on awareness of breath. Walking meditation requires mindfulness of both breath and the movements of the body and so heightened concentration required. The encouraging words of these monks is excellent encouragement. Big fan of Thich Naht Hahn!

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    • Author

      Sanders Whitley

      June 12, 2018 at 10:52pm

      Hi Adam, You are already practicing walking meditation, just not making the small connection between doing and thinking. All you really need to focus on is the present and walk, just to be moving. I do agree, more concentration and more focus helps! “Thay” has always seemed more grounded, perhaps because I have avoided his more in-depth teachings, going the direction of relaxation.
      Walking in the Path of Peace,
      Sanders

      Permalink  ⋅ Reply

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